Nihit Goyal

National University of Singapore
Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy

469C Bukit Timah Rd
Singapore
Singapore
259772
nihit@u.nus.edu |  Visit Personal Website


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My research interests lie in interdisciplinary approaches to energy, climate change, and sustainability, particularly focusing on governance and public policy analysis, design, and evaluation. My doctoral thesis critically examines the process of policy innovation and its diffusion by tracing the development of three state-level sustainable energy policies concerning energy access, energy efficiency, and low carbon energy in India. It uses a mixed methods design incorporating econometric analysis, qualitative comparative analysis, process tracing, and text mining of documents and interviews.

Citation:
Byravan, S., Ali, M.S., Ananthakumar, M.R., Goyal, N., Kanudia, A., Ramamurthi, P.V., Srinivasan, S. and Paladugula, A.L., 2017. Quality of life for all: A sustainable development framework for India's climate policy reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Energy for Sustainable Development, 39, pp.48-58.
Abstract: This study placed improving quality of life at the centre of India’s national climate policy and asked what happens to greenhouse gas emissions with such an approach. In the lead up to the Paris climate agreement in 2015, countries determined their contributions based on their priorities, contexts, and capabilities and prepared their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions. Following the agreement, these became each country’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC). Using bottom-up scenario analyses, the sectoral interventions modelled in this research demonstrate that it is possible to get close to achieving the country’s NDC targets while improving quality of life at the same time. A comparison of a Business-As-Usual (BAU) and a sustainable development (SD) pathway leading up to 2030 reveals that improvements in a range of sustainable development conditions are possible. These include reduction in air pollution, savings in water and land use, and savings in materials and resource requirements. These changes occur along with a nearly 30% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and a 25% reduction in primary energy compared with BAU. Emissions intensity in 2030 is reduced in the sustainable development pathway by 16% compared with that in 2012 and fossil-free sources are able to contribute to about a third of India’s electricity.
URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0973082616310572
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esd.2017.04.003
Citation:
Goyal, N., 2017. A “review” of policy sciences: bibliometric analysis of authors, references, and topics during 1970–2017. Policy Sciences, 50(4), pp.527-537.
Abstract: Even as Policy Sciences celebrates its fiftieth anniversary, there is no systematic account of the research that has been published in the journal. This article reports the findings of a bibliometric analysis of 1027 publications in this journal during 1970–2017. It identifies the authors who have contributed to the journal, the works that have influenced them, and the topics they have studied.
URL: http://rdcu.be/xVhg
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11077-017-9300-6
Citation:
Goyal, N. and Canning, D., 2017. Exposure to Ambient Fine Particulate Air Pollution in Utero as a Risk Factor for Child Stunting in Bangladesh. International journal of environmental research and public health, 15(1), p.22.
Abstract: Pregnant mothers in Bangladesh are exposed to very high and worsening levels of ambient air pollution. Maternal exposure to fine particulate matter has been associated with low birth weight at much lower levels of exposure, leading us to suspect the potentially large effects of air pollution on stunting in children in Bangladesh. We estimate the relationship between exposure to air pollution in utero and child stunting by pooling outcome data from four waves of the nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey conducted between 2004 and 2014, and calculating children’s exposure to ambient fine particulate matter in utero using high resolution satellite data. We find significant increases in the relative risk of child stunting, wasting, and underweight with higher levels of in utero exposure to air pollution, after controlling for other factors that have been found to contribute to child anthropometric failure. We estimate the relative risk of stunting in the second, third, and fourth quartiles of exposure as 1.074 (95% confidence interval: 1.014–1.138), 1.150 (95% confidence interval: 1.069–1.237, and 1.132 (95% confidence interval: 1.031–1.243), respectively. Over half of all children in Bangladesh in our sample were exposed to an annual ambient fine particulate matter level in excess of 46 µg/m3; these children had a relative risk of stunting over 1.13 times that of children in the lowest quartile of exposure. Reducing air pollution in Bangladesh could significantly contribute to the Sustainable Development Goal of reducing child stunting.
URL: http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/15/1/22#stats_id
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15010022

Substantive Focus:
Energy and Natural Resource Policy PRIMARY
Environmental Policy SECONDARY
Comparative Public Policy

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Process Theory
Agenda-Setting, Adoption, and Implementation SECONDARY
Policy Analysis and Evaluation PRIMARY