Elena Mastors

University of Phoenix
Faculty, WA
USA
emmastors@gmail.com

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My fields of interest include international relations, intelligence, and homeland security from a political psychological perspective. I focus mainly on the "why" and "how" with regard to issues related to conflict and terrorism and leadership analysis. For example, how do terrorist groups behave, how do we understand the leaders of organizations and groups, why do people torture, kill, or commit acts of violence?

Citation:
Citation:
Mastors, Elena & Burtchett, Nicole. 2014. “What’s in a Flag? Identity, Symbols and Protests in Belfast.” Peace and Society.
Citation:
Mastors, Elena. & Siers, Rhea. 2014. “Omar Hammami: A Case Study in Radicalization.” Behavioral Science & the Law.
Citation:
Mastors, Elena. 2014. Breaking al-Qaeda: Psychological and Operational Techniques. Boca Raton FL: CRC Press.
Citation:
Mastors, Elena and Norwitz, Jeff. 2009. "Influencing and Disrupting Leaders of Armed Groups: The Case of Ayman al-Zawahiri. Jeff Norwitz, ed. Pirates, Terrorist, and Warlords. New York: Skyhorse Publishing.
Citation:
Mastors, Elena. 2008. "Can the Ulster Defense Association Transform into Mainstream Politics. Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counterterrorism.
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Hesterman, Jenni and Mastors, Elena. 2011. "Internal Repression in Syria." The Counterterrorist.
Citation:
Cottam, Martha, Mastors, Elena, Preston, Tom and Dietz-Uhler, Beth. 2010. Introduction to Political Psychology. New York: Psychology Press.
Abstract: Provides an overview of how political psychology applies to the study of political behavior.
Citation:
Mastors, Elena, and Deffenbaugh, Alyssa. 2007. The Lesser Jihad: Recruits and the Al-Qaida Network. Boulder: Rowman and Littlfield.
Abstract: Explores the motivation for why individuals join the al-Qaida network.

Substantive Focus:
Governance
Defense and Security PRIMARY
International Relations SECONDARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Analysis and Evaluation PRIMARY

Keywords

TERRORISM CONFLICT LEADERSHIP INTELLIGENCE HOMELAND SECURITY POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY