Simon Matti

Luleå University of Technology
Political Science Unit

Political Science Unit
Luleå University of Technology
Luleå
Sweden
SE-97187
simon.matti@ltu.se |  Visit Personal Website


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Citation:
Lundmark, Carina, Simon Matti and Gabriel Michanek. 2010. "The Swedish Environmental Norm. Balancing Environmental Obligations and the Pursuit of Individual Lifestyles." Patrik Söderholm, ed. Environmental Policy and Household Behaviour: Sustainability and Everyday Life (pp.13-42). London: Earthscan.
Abstract: Chapter in edited book on environmental policy and household behaviour, focusing the legitimacy of Swedish environmental policy. Output from the SHARP Research PRogram funded by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (2003-2009).
URL: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781844078974/
Citation:
Matti, Simon. 2010. "Sticks, Carrots and Legitimate Policies - Effectiveness and Acceptance in Environmental Public Policy". Patrik Söderholm, ed. Environmental Policy and Household Behaviour: Sustainability and Everyday Life (pp. 69-98). London: Earthscan.
Abstract: Chapter in edited book on environmental policy and household behaviour, focusing the legitimacy of Swedish environmental policy. Output from the SHARP Research PRogram funded by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (2003-2009).
URL: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781844078974/
Citation:
Jagers, Sverker C.and Simon Matti. 2010. "Ecological Citizens: Identifying Values and Beliefs that Support Individual Environmental Responsibility among Swedes". Sustainability 2 (4):1055-1079.
Abstract: As it has been suggested that involvement of individuals in environmental work is necessary for halting environmental degradation, one focus for contemporary environmental policy and political theory is the need for comprehensive individual lifestyle changes. Ecological Citizenship (EC) has been suggested within the field of political theory as an approach to realize personal responsibility for the environment. However, empirical research on whether EC can serve this purpose is still lacking. Based on a survey sent to 4,000 Swedish households, this paper makes the theory of EC empirically operational and explores whether, and to what extent, people in general hold values and beliefs in line with what is expected of EC, in order to shed light on the feasibility of cultivating ecological citizens in Sweden. The study concludes that a significant proportion of the respondents do demonstrate a value base consistent with EC, i.e., non-territorial altruism and the primacy of social justice. While additional tests and studies are needed, the results support the use of EC as a theoretical model for behavioral change.
DOI: 10.3390/su2041055
Citation:
Matti, Simon and Annica Sandström. 2011. "The Rationale Determining Advocacy Coalitions: Examining Coordination Networks and Corresponding Beliefs". Policy Studies Journal 39 (3):385-410.
Abstract: The contemporary trend within natural resource governance sees a strong increase in collaborative management. A successful turnout of these arrangements is, however, dependent upon the formation and characteristics of advocacy coalitions. Uncovering the rationale determining coalitions is therefore a key undertaking in policy analysis and the advocacy coalition framework (ACF) has been widely applied for this purpose. This article aspires to test several important hypotheses regarding the nature of coordination networks and the formation of coalitions, treating the ACF both as an inspiration and as a framework in need of further refinement. This is done in the context of a complex and conflict-ridden policy subsystem: the Swedish carnivore-management subsystem. The results indicate, firstly, that perceived belief correspondence, and not perceived influence, is the driving mechanism behind coordination; and, secondly, that the catalog of beliefs shared by actors within a coalition is composed by policy core beliefs, in particular, with a more normative content, while no connection between deep core beliefs and coordination is found.
DOI: 10.1111/j.1541-0072.2011.00414.x
Citation:
Matti, Simon and Annica Sandström. 2013. "The Defining Elements of Advocacy Coalitions: Continuing the Search for Explanations for Coordination and Coalition Structures." Review of Policy Research 30 (2):240-257.
Abstract: As the theoretical and practical interest in policy networks increases, so does the need for further research into how, and based on what rationales, actors within a policy subsystem engage in interorganizational collective action and form political coalitions. The aim of this paper is to continue the search for explanations for coordination and coalition structures in the setting of Swedish carnivore policy. Based on the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) and a previous case study within the same policy subsystem, the study investigates a set of hypotheses regarding actors' coordinating behavior and the defining elements of coalitions. The empirical analysis indicates, in support of the ACF, that perceived belief correspondence is a better predictor of coordination than perceived influence. Moreover, the explanatory power of empirical policy core beliefs in general, and normative policy core beliefs in particular, is further reinforced, while deep core beliefs seemingly do not influence coalition structure. The relevance of more shallow beliefs for coalition formation cannot be dismissed and therefore calls for additional research.
DOI: 10.1111/ropr.12011

Substantive Focus:
Energy and Natural Resource Policy SECONDARY
Environmental Policy PRIMARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Process Theory SECONDARY
Policy Analysis and Evaluation
Public Opinion PRIMARY

Keywords

ENVIRONMENT PUBLIC OPINION PUBLIC POLICY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COALITIONS BELIEF SYSTEMS VALUES