Helen Ingram

University of Arizona and University of California at Irvine
Southwest Center

4749 East San Francisco Blvd.
Tucson, AZ
85712
hingram@uci.edu

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Helen Ingram's published works include fifteen authored, coauthored and edited books and over a hundred articles and book chapters on public policy, policy design, water policy, environmental policy, and the relationship of science to policy. She is best known in public policy and political science for her work with Anne Schneider on the social construction of target populations. Her interests include public policy and science and policy design as well as fields indicated above. Her most recent work concentrates on narrative approaches to public policy analysis and relational knowledge production. She is on the Advisory Committee of the Rosenberg Forum on International Water Policy.

Citation:
Ingram, Mrill, Helen Ingram and Raul Lejano (2014) Whats the Story: Creating and Sustaining Environmental Networks
Abstract: Networks have been embraced as appropriate means for environmental governance because of their potential inclusivity, flexibility, resilience, and ability to comprehend multiple values and ways of knowing. Analysis of networks, however, falls short of accounting for the emergence and persistence of these innovative and complex modes of governance, as well as their failures. In this article we offer a framework for using narrative to understand and evaluate networks. We understand networks to be sets of relationships between humans and also between humans and their environment that define and guide behavior. We suggest that narrative is a constitutive element of these networks--that narrative and network are co-produced. Narrative analysis enables a critical investigation of environmental action and policy at the same time it captures the variety of environmental relationships and associated meanings and emotions that can inspire collaborative behavior. Using a case study of the development of alternative agriculture in the U.S. we provide a methodology for investigating “narrative-networks” that affords deeper explanations of how and why emergent, often informal and unlikely, environmental networks endure over time.
DOI: 10.1080/0944016.2014.919717
Citation:
Citation:
Brugnach, Marcela and Helen Ingram )2012 Ambiguity: the challenge of knowing and deciding together” environmental science & policy 15: 60–71
Abstract: Despite the claims of inclusiveness advanced by integrative approaches to resource manage- ment, the substance of decisions hardly reflect the diversity of meanings and interpretations that the inclusion of multiple actors implies. We assess the knowledge production processes currently employed in natural resources management, particularly water resources, and claim that part of this problem resides in how ambiguity is handled. From this perspective, we suggest that coping with ambiguity requires a reformulation of the knowledge production processes employed, in terms of the types of knowledge used, how and by whom it is created, what values are incorporated and how values are weighted. Here, we discuss the flawed assumptions of the operative knowledge production processes and the characteristics and challenges of knowledge production models better able to cope with ambiguity through integrative practices. Finally, we provide practical recommendations to facilitate implemen- tation of knowledge co-production processes that can better actualize integration based on deliberation, open space for dialogue, negotiation and learning.
Citation:
Lejano, R, Mrill Ingram and Helen Ingram (2013) The Power of Narratives in Environmental Networks. Cambridge: MIT Press.
Abstract: Networks have been touted as appropriate means for environmental governance because of their potential inclusivity, flexibility, resilience, and ability to comprehend multiple values and kinds of knowledge. However, traditional network analysis falls short of accounting for the emergence and persistence of these innovative and complex modes of governance, as well as their failures. This book offer a framework for using narrative to understand and evaluate networks. We understand networks to be sets of relationships between humans and the environment that define and guide behavior. Furthermore, we understand narrative to be a constitutive element of these networks--that narrative and network are co-produced. In this book we review some of the policy and environmental literatures using networks and the intersection with literature on narrative as enabling critical analysis of environmental action and policy. We introduce our idea of narrative-networks. This new framework affords deeper explanations of how and why emergent, often informal and unlikely, environmental networks endure over time.
URL: http://ISBN 9780262019378

Substantive Focus:
Environmental Policy PRIMARY
Science and Technology Policy SECONDARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Process Theory PRIMARY

Keywords

NETWORKS NARRATIVES ENVIRONMENT WATER