Patrik Marier

Concordia University
Political Science

1455 Blvd. de Maisonneuve West
Montreal, Quebec
Canada
H3G 1M8
patrik.marier@concordia.ca |  Visit Personal Website


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Dr. Marier's current research focuses on challenges to the welfare state and governmental planning to tackle the impact of population ageing. He holds the Concordia University Research Chair in Aging and Public Policy, which focuses mainly on the administrative and policy challenges surrounding population ageing. He is currently working on a book length manuscript comparing the strategies developed by Canadian provinces to face the consequences of population ageing. Dr. Marier is also scientific director of the Centre de recherche et d'expertise en gérontologie sociale.

Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2013. "How Should We Administer Population Aging? A Canadian Comparison." International Journal of Canadian Studies 47:101-122.
Abstract: This article presents a comparative analysis of four Canadian provinces (Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Saskatchewan) with different administrative responses to population aging. The way in which population aging is tackled administratively matters greatly because it drives the type of policy responses being proposed and implemented.
DOI: 10.1353/ijc.2013.001
Citation:
Marier, Patrik, Stephanie Paterson and Mariel Angus. 2014. "From Quacks to Professionals: The Importance of Changing Social Constructions in the Policy-Making Process.: Policy Studies 35 (4):413-433.
Abstract: The social construction of target populations (SCTP) approach assumes that policies are constructed to benefit (or punish) specific groups of citizens based on their relative power and social construction. This contribution tackles one of the most sustained critiques of the SCTP literature, namely, how a group can alter its social construction and power. Stated differently, how does a group move from being constructed as dependent or deviant to contenders or advantaged? In 1991, the government in Ontario, Canada, proclaimed what is arguably the most progressive midwifery legislation in the world. The Midwifery Act established midwifery as a self-regulating profession, fully integrated into the province's public health insurance system, and enables midwives to catch babies in hospitals, homes and birthing centres. What is striking about the legislation is the contentious debate preceding it, in which midwives were constructed as ‘quacks’, incompetent and unclean, compared to professional physicians. In this paper, we explore the role of commissions of inquiries (COI) in shifting social constructions. Specifically, we argue that COI legitimised the authoritative knowledge of moral entrepreneurs and facilitated the necessary interaction between moral and political entrepreneurs, which in turn reconstructed midwives from ‘quacks’ to experts, and resulted in significant policy change.
DOI: 10.1080/01442872.2013.877582
Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2012. "Squeezing Social Partners to Embrace Reforms: The Case of Private Earnings Related Pension Schemes." Global Social Policy 12 (3):316-331.
Abstract: How do changes to public schemes and ongoing economic difficulties impact private earnings-related pension schemes (PERPS) governed by social partners? The decreasing generosity of public schemes does put strong pressure onto social partners to improve their PERPS; however, PERPS face challenges of their own related to their integration within the pension system and their financing mechanisms. Based on a comparative analysis of Finland, France, the Netherlands and Sweden, this contribution demonstrates that PERPS have all enacted measures to reduce the generosity of their scheme. Yet, the emerging policy measures responding to these challenges are quite different and depend on the previous public/private mix and the financial structure behind their PERPS.
URL: http://gsp.sagepub.com/content/12/3/316.abstract
DOI: 10.1177/1468018112455654
Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2013. "Who Pays the Piper Calls the Tune? Comparing Canada’s and EU’s Expansionary Role in Pensions." Canadian Public Administration 56 (2):322-337.
Abstract: Both Canada and the European Union (EU) have been active in developing pension policies despite the lack of formal mandates to do so. While the Canadian government used its fiscal powers to expand its role in pension programs when pension emerged as a policy issue, the EU has been strongly limited by its lack of resources, institutional complexities, and the maturity of public pension programs in its member states. The EU experience generates interesting lessons for Canadian policy makers who are dealing with increasingly complex pension issues.
DOI: 10.1111/capa.12021
Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2013. "A Swedish Welfare State in North America? The Development of the Saskatchewan Welfare State, 1944-1982." Journal of Policy History 25 (4):614-637.
Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2010. "Improving Canada's Retirement Savings: Lessons from Abroad, Ideas from Home." Montreal: IRPP.
Abstract: Until now Canada’s retirement income system has done well in alleviating elders’ poverty and helping workers maintain their standard of living in retirement. But according to Patrik Marier, the latter achievement is threatened by problems in the coverage and governance of occupational pensions, and by the voluntary nature and high cost of savings alternatives. These issues, together with the limited generosity of public pension programs, mean that a significant proportion of today’s middle-income earners could face a decline in their living standards when they retire. Patrik Marier looks at pension reforms in Norway, Sweden, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Saskatchewan to determine if there are lessons for Canada, and finds that all five systems have features that would complement Canada’s public pensions.
URL: http://www.irpp.org/show_study.php?id=351
Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2010. "Improving Canada's Retirement Savings: Lessons from Abroad, Ideas from Home." Montreal: IRPP.
Abstract: Until now Canada’s retirement income system has done well in alleviating elders’ poverty and helping workers maintain their standard of living in retirement. But according to Patrik Marier, the latter achievement is threatened by problems in the coverage and governance of occupational pensions, and by the voluntary nature and high cost of savings alternatives. These issues, together with the limited generosity of public pension programs, mean that a significant proportion of today’s middle-income earners could face a decline in their living standards when they retire. Patrik Marier looks at pension reforms in Norway, Sweden, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Saskatchewan to determine if there are lessons for Canada, and finds that all five systems have features that would complement Canada’s public pensions.
URL: http://www.irpp.org/show_study.php?id=351
Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2009. "The Power of Institutionalized Learning: The Uses and Practices of Commissions to Generate Policy Change." Journal of European Public Policy 16 (8):1204-1223.
Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2005. "Where Did the Bureaucrats Go? Role and Influence of the Public Bureaucracy in the Swedish and French Pension Reform Debate." Governance: An International Journal of Policy, Administration, and Institutions 18 (4):521-544.
Citation:
Marier, Patrik (2014). ‘Les systèmes de retraite québécois et suédois: approches différentes, résultats similaires’ in Stéphane Paquin and Pier-Luc Lévesque (eds.), Sociale-démocratie 2.0 : Le Québec comparé aux pays scandinaves. Montréal : Presses de l’Université de Montréal. P. 231-248.
URL: http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/catalogue/social-democratie-2_0/couverture
Citation:
Marier, Patrik (ed.). 2012. Le vieillissement de la population et les politiques publiques: enjeux d'ici et d'ailleurs. Québec: Presses de l'Université Laval.
Abstract: Le vieillissement de la population et les politiques publiques vise à éclairer les débats concernant les enjeux liés aux importants changements démographiques. En présentant un ouvrage diversifié, tant par son approche multidisciplinaire que par ses méthodes, ce volume s’illustre par ses contributions dans plusieurs champs des politiques publiques, dont la santé, les retraites, les soins de longue durée, le marché du travail et les transports. Le vieillissement de la population et les politiques publiques inclut aussi une section sur les leçons d’ailleurs pour améliorer nos politiques et une autre qui traite des grands débats entourant la question des changements démographiques et l’action publique. Ce livre s’avérera un outil indispensable pour les étudiants, universitaires, analystes et décideurs publics qui désirent approfondir leurs connaissances sur les conséquences du vieillissement de la population.
URL: http://goo.gl/akQaG
Citation:
Marier, Patrik. 2008. Pension Politics: Consensus and Social Conflict in Ageing Societies. London: Routledge.

Substantive Focus:
Economic Policy
Governance
Social Policy SECONDARY
Comparative Public Policy PRIMARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy History SECONDARY
Policy Process Theory PRIMARY

Keywords

COMPARATIVE PUBLIC POLICY WELFARE STATE LONG-TERM PLANNING POPULATION AGING PENSIONS SCANDINAVIA CANADA COMPARATIVE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION