Paul Cisneros

Instituto de Altos Estudios Nacionales
Gobierno y Administraci├│n P├║blica

Manrique Lara
Miguel Albornoz
Quito, Pichincha
Ecuador
170506
paulcisnerosa@gmail.com |  Visit Personal Website


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My work deals with environmental governance in the Andean region. I apply a variety of methods to study policy change in areas such as mining, forestry and water management. I am particularly interested in how social actors organize to change public policy and how changes affect their collective-action organizations.

Citation:
Cisneros, Paúl, and Lucas Christel. 2014. "The democracy deficit of corporate social responsibility in post/neoliberalimes: an analysis of the Argentinian and Ecuadorian experiences." Journal of Cleaner Production 84: 174-182.
Abstract: Several evaluations of contemporary left-of-center governments in South America suggest that natural resource governance in the region has become post-neoliberal only in the sense that States augmented the appropriation and distribution of rent motivated by sustained international demand for commodities. The political ecologies of mining remain characterized by increasing demands for more democratic decision-making as occurred in the 1990s. In order to explain this continuity, most studies focus on the interactions between States and civil societies. They state that a pragmatic stance on resource governance regards rent capture and distribution over the development of mechanisms for inclusion in decision-making. These assessments give only a partial account of the interactions involved in such dynamic, they underestimate corporate behavior as a central component of emerging forms of governance. We argue that companies were central actors of the production of mining conflicts during the 1990s and still exert an important degree of influence in resource governance through corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies. Our findings show that since the neoliberal legal and administrative reforms of the early 1990s, Argentinian and Ecuadorian governments have supported a system of mining governance that regards the economic interests over the demands for more democratic decision-making. Nevertheless, even after recognizing the deleterious effects of neoliberal CSR practiced by companies, left-of-center governments have not been able to steer corporate behavior in a new direction.
URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652614002534
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.03.032

Substantive Focus:
Environmental Policy PRIMARY
Comparative Public Policy SECONDARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Process Theory PRIMARY
Agenda-Setting, Adoption, and Implementation SECONDARY
Policy Analysis and Evaluation

Keywords

MINING GOVERNANCE WATER FUNDS CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY LATIN AMERICA WATER POLICY MINING POLICY ADAPTATION POLICY