Michael T. Hayes

Colgate University
Political Science

111 Persson Hall
13 Oak Drive
Hamilton, NY
USA
13346
mhayes@colgate.edu

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I am currently working on a revision of Theodore Lowi's foreign policy typology. My next project will look at the relationship between incrementalism and the concept of prudence. Incrementalism stresses the need to focus on alternatives that focus only marginally from existing policies while prudence emphasizes the goal of gaining as much as possible of the good. While what makes for good public policy will almost always be contested, skilled policy entrepreneurs can navigate the legislative process to obtain the largest possible increments.

Citation:
Hayes, Michael. 2013. "Incrementalism." Chapter 22 in Routledge Handbook of Public Policy (London and New York: Routledge), pp. 287-298.
Abstract: A chapter reviewing incrementalism as both a descriptive and normative model of policy-making.
Citation:
Hayes, Michael T. 2001. The Limits of Policy Change: Incrementalism, Worldview, and the Rule of Law. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.
Abstract: Explores the limits of policy change through a variety of theoretical models and case studies.
Citation:
Hayes, Michael T. 2007. "Policy-making Through Disjointed Incrementalism." In Handbook of Decisionmaking, ed. Goktug Morcal. Boca Raton, FL: Taylor and Francis, p. 39-59.
Abstract: A thorough review of the concept of incrementalism. Reviews the major elements of incrementalism and the conditions under which policies may depart from incrementalism. It also develops a typology of four worldviews, explaining why some worldviews will embrace incrementalism while others will not.
Citation:
Hayes, Michael T. 2007. "Policy Characteristics, Patterns of Politics, and the Minimum Wage: Toward a Typology of Redistributive Policies." Policy Studies Journal 35 (4): 465-480.
Abstract: Examines the minimum wage issue in light of my revised version of Theodore Lowi's classic policy typology. Identifies four distinct forms of redistributive policy and shows that the minimum wage issue has fit into three different categories at different times.

Substantive Focus:
Social Policy PRIMARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Process Theory PRIMARY
Agenda-Setting, Adoption, and Implementation SECONDARY

Keywords

INCREMENTALISM POLICY TYPOLOGIES REDISTRIBUTIVE POLICIES