Jay Ananda

CQUniversity Australia
School of Business and Law

120 Spencer Street
Melbourne, VIC
Australia
3000
j.ananda@cqu.edu.au

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My current research centers on efficiency and productivity analysis of water sector and climate change adaptation. In the past, I have researched institutional analysis and social preference modeling using multi-attribute techniques in the context of land-use policy planning and implementation. I am particularly interested in environmental policy processes and water policy making.

Citation:
Ananda, J., and G. Herath. 2008. "Multi-Attribute Preference Modelling and Regional Land-Use Planning." Ecological Economics, 65(2): 325-335.
Citation:
Ananda, J., L. Crase and P. G. Pagan. 2006. "A Preliminary Assessment Of Water-Related Institutions." India Review of Policy Research, 23(4): 927-953.
Citation:
Ananda, J., and Herath, G. 2003. "Soil Erosion in Developing Countries: A Socio-Economic Appraisal." Journal of Environmental Management, 68: 343-53.
Citation:
Ananda, J. 2013. "Evaluating the Performance of Urban Water Utilities: A Robust Nonparametric Approach." Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management.
Abstract: This paper empirically analyses the efficiency of urban water utilities using state-of-the-art methodology combining Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and a two-stage double bootstrap procedure. In the first stage, robust efficiency estimates are obtained with an improved DEA analysis. In the second stage, a truncated regression model and a double bootstrap procedure are used to estimate the effect of a set of environmental variables on unbiased DEA estimates. The findings suggest that the efficiency scores obtained after bias correction are significantly different to the original efficiency estimates. The results also show the existence of a significant relation between efficiency and several environmental variables including the proportion of water sourced from groundwater, customer density and residential consumption.
DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)WR.1943-5452.0000387
Citation:
Ananda, J. 2012. "Role of Local Institutions in Formulating Climate Change Adaptation Strategies to a Low Water Future: A Public Policy Perspective." Australasian Journal of Regional Studies, 18(3): 315-341
Abstract: This paper examines the role of local institutions in supporting climate change adaptation action from a public policy perspective. While certain adaptation actions will provide public benefits, many others will offer private benefits. The paper argues that adaptation investments and assigning the adaptation responsibility across various actors should be guided by a clear public-private benefit framework. A case study of adapting to a ‘low water future’ in North East Victoria is used to discuss the role of local institutions and industries in formulating climate change adaptation strategies. The findings indicate that formulating adaptation strategies, at the local level, has been complicated by the existence of considerable uncertainty in the nature and magnitude of adverse climatic impacts. The planning problem is further exacerbated by considerable information asymmetries and moral hazard issues inhibiting climate change adaptation for reduced water supply by local institutions and industries.
Citation:
Ananda, J. 2014. "Institutional Reforms to Enhance Urban Water Infrastructure with Climate Change Uncertainty." Economic Papers: A Journal of Applied Economics and Policy, 33(2): 123-136.
Abstract: Climate change adds another layer of uncertainty to the complex issue of urban water infrastructure provision. Current institutional configurations surrounding infrastructure investments are deemed inflexible and ill-equipped to deal with climate uncertainty. This paper evaluates the regulatory and planning frameworks surrounding the urban water infrastructure provision in Victoria. Regulatory inflexibility, lack of clarity in the objectives of the water agencies and opaque supply augmentation policies constrain water businesses from making flexible infrastructure decisions. Future reforms need to focus on clarifying roles and objectives of water agencies, removing barriers to supply augmentation options including inter-sectoral transfers and a regulatory model that embeds flexibility in infrastructure decision processes.
Citation:
Ananda, J. and Proctor, W. 2013. ‘Collaborative Approaches to Water Management and Planning: An Institutional Perspective’ Ecological Economics 86: 97-106.
Abstract: Despite the popularity and rhetoric of collaborative approaches, the successes of such initiatives are not widespread and remain elusive. Some commentators argue that without ‘the noise of participation,' a return to centralised governance should be reconsidered. Whilst this conclusion may be premature given the lack of rigorous analysis of collaborative approaches, it calls for a closer examination of contexts and processes that are conducive to the success of collaborative initiatives. This paper evaluates the scope of collaborative watershed management and planning in the Howard River Catchment in northern Australia. The findings depict the challenges of collaborative planning in a nested hierarchy with multiple institutions. The existing institutional apparatus can potentially constrain the collaborative initiatives to water planning. They include the norms of agency authority, administrative inflexibility and power structures in a nested institutional hierarchy. Delegating decision making responsibility to decentralized structures should be backed up by the development of the capacity of such structures. Considerable transaction costs exist in overlaying collaborative approaches across a nested hierarchy of multiple institutions.
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2012.10.018
Citation:
Ananda, J. 2013. Watershed Development, Decentralization and Institutional Change: Insights from the Mechanism Design Theory. In Roldan, M. and Rival. L. (eds.) Governing the Provision of Ecosystem Services, Studies in Ecological Economics 4, Springer Science, pp.135-149.
Abstract: Watershed development (WSD) is one of the core strategies to arrest widespread resource degradation and reduce poverty in India’s semi-arid regions. Although many WSD initiatives had positive short-term impacts, long term returns to investment have been questioned. Overall, past approaches of WSD programmes have had slow, inequitable and short-lived impact. In recent times, many WSD programmes have taken a participatory approach, where state governments share costs and benefits with local communities. The shift towards a participatory approach largely stems from the failure of the top-down approach. There are several varied institutional configurations involved in implementing WSD programmes including non-governmental organisations, government departments and various partnership arrangements. The 73rd amendment of the Indian Constitution provided an impetus for decentralisation by strengthening local government bodies, collectively called Panchayat Raj Institutions (PRIs) at district, block and village levels. These self-governing bodies have been given an expanded role in implementing WSD initiatives within a nested and decentralised institutional environment. This chapter examines the institutional apparatus of WSD programmes in India. Using mechanism design theory, the chapter evaluates the new institutional structures proposed by the WSD Common Guidelines of 2008. The findings indicate that there is tension between traditional government bureaucracies and self-governing bodies. Informational asymmetries, inadequate devolution and capacity constraints preclude the WSD implementing agencies achieving their full potential in delivering outcomes. Future institutional reforms should focus on lowering information gathering and processing costs and enhancing technical skills at the local level. Reforms to contractual agreements between the state government and the Project Implementing Agencies are also needed in order to provide renegotiating opportunities and robust compliance mechanisms.
Citation:
Ananda, J. 2014. ‘Evaluating the Performance of Urban Water Utilities: A Robust Nonparametric Approach’ Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 140(9): 04014021.
Abstract: This paper empirically analyzes the efficiency of urban water utilities using state-of-the-art methodology combining data envelopment analysis (DEA) and a two-stage double bootstrap procedure. In the first stage, robust efficiency estimates are obtained with an improved DEA analysis. In the second stage, a truncated regression model and a double bootstrap procedure are used to estimate the effect of a set of environmental variables on unbiased DEA estimates. The findings suggest that the efficiency scores obtained after bias correction are significantly different to the original efficiency estimates. The results also show the existence of a significant relation between efficiency and several environmental variables including the proportion of water sourced from groundwater, customer density, and residential consumption.
URL: http:// http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29WR.1943-5452.0000387
Citation:
Ananda, J. 2013. Institutional Design Perspective, Capacity Constraints and Participatory Irrigation Management, In Prakash, A., Singh, S., Goodrich, C.G. and Janakarajan, S. (eds.) Water Resources Policies in South Asia, Routledge, New Delhi, pp. 99-115.

Substantive Focus:
Economic Policy PRIMARY
Energy and Natural Resource Policy
Environmental Policy SECONDARY
Governance
Urban Public Policy

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Analysis and Evaluation PRIMARY

Keywords

WATER POLICY CLIMATE CHANGE ECONOMICS GROUNDWATER GOVERNANCE PRODUCTIVITY ANALYSIS EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS CLIMATE CHANGE GROUNDWATER GOVERNANCE