Gary Dean Painter

University of Southern California
SPPD

RGL 301A
Los Angeles, CA
USA
90089-0626
gpainter@usc.edu

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Professor Painter's research interests focus on education, housing and urban economics. His most recent work in housing has focused on the determinants of homeownership among immigrants and racial and ethnic minorities. He has written several papers using Census data to address questions of migration, mobility, and tenure choice. Some of his recent work in education has focused on the importance of neighborhood sorting in determining the role of school quality in determining education outcomes and on the impact of various kindergarten policies on future educational attainment.

Citation:
Painter, Gary, and KwanOk Lee. 2009. “Housing Tenure Transitions of Older Households: Life Cycle, Demographic, and Familial Factors.” Regional Science and Urban Economics 39 (6): 749-760.
Abstract: Understanding the housing choices of the older households will grow in importance as the baby boomrngeneration starts to retire. This analysis utilizes a rich longitudinal data set (PSID) to provide insight into the reasons why older households make housing transitions. Because of the richness of the data, this analysis is able to control for life transitions, a household's income and wealth, and connection to one's children in predicting when a homeowner makes a housing transition. The results demonstrate that age is not related directly to housing tenure choice for older households. Instead, having lower health status and being a single head of household is the important predictor of housing tenure transitions. At the same time, very few life changing events immediately lead a homeowner to become a renter, although they do influence the decision to downsize or consumer home equity. Finally, living next to one's children lowers the probability of becoming a renter or downsizing, and having richer children increases the probability of downsizing and thereby consuming one's housing wealth.
Citation:
Cannon, Jill, Alison Jacknowitz, and Gary Painter. Forthcoming. “The Impact of Attending Full Day Kindergarten for English Language Learners.” Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.
Abstract: A significant and growing English learner (EL) population attends public schools in the United States. Evidence suggests they are at a disadvantage when entering school and their achievement lags behind non-EL students. Some educators have promoted full-day kindergarten programs as especially helpful for EL students. We take advantage of the large EL population and variation in full-day kindergartenrnimplementation in the Los Angeles Unified School District to examine the impact of full-day kindergarten on academic achievement, retention, and English language fluency using difference-in-differences models. We do not find signficant effects of full-day kindergarten on most academic outcomes and English fluency through second grade. However, we find that EL students attending full-day kindergarten were 5 percentage points less likely to be retained before second grade and there are differential effects for several outcomes by student and school characteristics.rn
Citation:
Painter, Gary, and Zhou Yu. 2010. “Immigrants and Housing Markets in Mid-size Metropolitan Areas.” International Migration Review 44 (2): 442-476.
Abstract: The recent trend of immigrants arriving in mid-size metropolitan areas has received growing attention in the literature. This study examines the success of immigrants in the housing markets of a samplernof 60 metropolitan areas using Census microdata in both 2000 and 2005. The results suggest that immigrants are less successful in achieving homeownership and more likely to live in overcrowdedrnconditions than native-born whites of non-Hispanic origin. The immigrant effect on homeownership differs by geography and by immigrant group. Finally, we find evidence that immigrant networksrnincrease the likelihood of becoming a homeowner.

Substantive Focus:
Economic Policy
Education Policy
Social Policy

Theoretical Focus:

Keywords

IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION K-12 EDUCATION HOUSING ECONOMICS URBAN ECONOMICS