Kristin A. Goss

Duke University
Sanford School of Public Policy

Box 90245, Duke University
Sanford School, Room 234
Durham, NC
USA
27708
kgoss@duke.edu |  Visit Personal Website


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My work spans three categories: 1) gun politics and policy; 2) gender politics and policy; and 3) philanthropy and public policy. My current book project explores the role of elite donors in a populist age, in particular how public policy has empowered foundations and individual philanthropists and how they pursue their policy ambitions in an age when elite expertise and state approaches are in some disrepute.

Citation:
Kristin A. Goss. 2017. “The Swells Between the ‘Waves’: American Women’s Activism, 1920-1965.” In Holly McCammon et al., eds., The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Women’s Social Movement Activism, 51-70 (Ch. 2). New York: Oxford University Press.
Abstract: This article demonstrates that the supposedly "quiet" middle decades of the 20th century were actually marked by a great deal of women's collective action around a wide variety of policy concerns. This activism spanned race and class.
Citation:
Kristin A. Goss. 2016. “Policy Plutocrats: How America’s Wealthy Influence Governance.” PS: Political Science & Politics 49 (3): 442-448.
Abstract: This article provides the first systematic overview of elite philanthropists and their policy concerns. It explores the magnitude of their giving, the issues to which it is directed. I find that they are generally liberal on post-modern issues but more market-oriented on economic issues. Normative concerns of democratic accountability are also discussed.
Citation:
Jennifer D. Carlson and Kristin A. Goss. 2017. “Gendering the Second Amendment.” Law & Contemporary Problems 80 (2): 103-128.
Abstract: This article periodizes the state as a gendered institution and illustrates how policy regimes around guns reflect different ideas about the gendered state.
Citation:
Goss, Kristin A. 2017. "The Socialization of Conflict and Its Limits: Gender and Gun Politics in America." Social Science Quaterly 98 (2): 455-470.
Abstract: This article shows the persistence of the gender gap in public opinion about firearms policy, in gun ownership, and in political mobilization on the gun issue. It also demonstrates that gender itself, not a factor confounded with gender, is largely responsible for the gap.
Citation:
Cook, Philip J., and Kristin A. Goss. 2014. The Gun Debate: What Everyone Needs to Know. New York: Oxford University Press.
Abstract: The book is a primer on gun politics and policy in America, covering the ownership, use, and misuse of firearms, as well as the historical, political, and policy context in which the debate over guns has unfolded.
Citation:
Goss, Kristin A. 2015. “Defying the Odds on Gun Regulation: The Passage of Bipartisan Mental Health Laws Across the States.” American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 85 (3):203-210.
Citation:
Goss, Kristin A. 2012. The Paradox of Gender Equality: How American Women's Groups Gained and Lost Their Public Voice. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Citation:
Goss, Kristin A. 2010. “Civil Society and Civic Engagement: Toward a Multilevel Theory of Policy Feedbacks.” Journal of Civil Society 6 (2): 119-143.
Citation:
Goss, Kristin A., and Michael T. Heaney. 2010. “Organizing Women as Women: Hybridity and Grassroots Collective Action in the 21st Century, Perspectives on Politics 8 (1): 27-52.
Citation:
Goss, Kristin A. 2006, 2009. Disarmed: The Missing Movement for Gun Control in America. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Substantive Focus:
Law and Policy SECONDARY
Social Policy PRIMARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy History SECONDARY
Agenda-Setting, Adoption, and Implementation PRIMARY

Keywords

INTEREST GROUPS GENDER WOMEN GUN CONTROL PHILANTHROPY POLICY FEEDBACK NONPROFIT SECTOR AGENDA-SETTING ANIMAL WELFARE CIVIC ENGAGEMENT POLICY FEEDBACKS