Imtiaz Bhatti

The George Washington University
Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration

805 21st St.
NW
Washington, DC
USA
20052
ibhatti@gwmail.gwu.edu

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My research interests include fiscal institutions, behavioral public finance, sovereign debts, and budget reforms. Currently, I am studying the impact of Institutions of fiscal discipline on macroeconomic variables in both advanced and transition economies.

Citation:
Bhatti, I and Phaup, M. (2015). “Budgeting for Fiscal Uncertainty and Bias: A Federal Process Proposal.” Public Budgeting and Finance, 35(2): 89–105.
Abstract: Balanced budget constraints have forced sub-national governments to anticipate and mitigate the adverse effects of fiscal shocks on budget balance, services, and tax rates. By contrast, the federal government responds to negative budget surprises with increased borrowing. That response is consistent with short-term economic stabilization, national security, and assisting those suffering loss. Nonetheless, an automatic default-to-debt response requires a routine means of restoring debt to planned levels. Otherwise, increases in public debt imply unplanned increases in future tax rates, reduced fiscal flexibility, lower income, and allocative inefficiency. We propose a procedural offset to debt drift from shocks and planning bias.
URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pbaf.12065/abstract
Citation:
Bhatti, I. 2009. "The Post-American World” by Fareed Zakaria. Book review in Policy Perspectives, 16. The George Washington University.
Abstract: Book review of Fareed Zakaria's "The Post-American World”
URL: http://www.policy-perspectives.org/article/view/4245/10.4079pp.v16i1.4245
Citation:
Bhatti, I, and Marvin Phaup. 2013. "A Case for Adding a Long-Term Budget Constraint to the Congressional Budget Process." Albany Government Law Review, 6(1). Albany Law School, Albany, NY.
Abstract: The current federal budget process is broken. That judgment is approaching a consensus among informed observers, even though the bases for conclusion vary. Perhaps the most widely-held view is that the current process has failed to produce fiscal policies consistent with the fundamental objective of economic stability. This failing has both long-term and short-term aspects. First, the government is on a long-term trajectory to default. The government cannot keep all the promises it has made explicitly to creditors and implicitly to beneficiaries and taxpayers. As a matter of arithmetic, resources available to government under current policy are insufficient to meet all of its commitments. Claim holders in the future must receive less than government has encouraged them to expect.
URL: http://www.albanygovernmentlawreview.org/archives/pages/article-information.aspx?volume=6&issue=1&page=110

Substantive Focus:
Economic Policy PRIMARY
Governance SECONDARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Analysis and Evaluation PRIMARY

Keywords

BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS PUBLIC BUDGETING FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY PUBLIC FINANCE FISCAL INSTITUTIONS