Yvette Toma

New York University
Center for Global Affairs
ydt202@nyu.edu

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Transnational security with a focus on counter terrorism - While the United States has robustly invested in the resources necessary to cripple terrorist activities both abroad and within our borders, challenges remain in our domestic capacities to effectively counter nuclear threats to the country. My research agenda concentrates on the vulnerabilities of the existing security measures to thwart an act of nuclear terrorism for the purpose of enhancing security guidelines safeguarding our borders.

Citation:
Cirincione, Joseph. 2007. Bomb Scare: The History and Future of Nuclear Weapons. Columbia University Press.
Abstract: Since their inception, nuclear weapons have multiplied at an alarming rate, leaving everyone from policymakers to concerned citizens wondering what it will take to slow, stop, or even reverse their spread. With clarity and expertise, Joseph Cirincione presents an even-handed look at the history of nuclear proliferation and an optimistic vision of its future, providing a comprehensive survey of the wide range of critical perspectives. Cirincione begins with the first atomic discoveries of the 1930s and covers the history of their growth all the way to current crisis with Iran. He unravels the science, strategy, and politics that have fueled the development of nuclear stockpiles and increased the chance of a nuclear terrorist attack. He also explains why many nations choose not to pursue nuclear weapons and pulls from this the outlines of a solution to the world's proliferation problem: a balance of force and diplomacy, enforcement and engagement that yields a steady decrease in these deadly arsenals. Though nuclear weapons have not been used in war since August 1945, there is no guarantee this good fortune will continue. A unique blend of history, theory, and security analysis, Bomb Scare is an engaging text that not only supplies the general reader and student with a clear understanding of this issue but also provides a set of tools policymakers and scholars can use to prevent the cataclysmic consequences of another nuclear attack.
Citation:
Ferguson, Charles D. 2011. Nuclear Energy: What Everyone Needs to Know. Oxford University Press.
Abstract: Originally perceived as a cheap and plentiful source of power, the commercial use of nuclear energy has been controversial for decades. Worries about the dangers that nuclear plants and their radioactive waste posed to nearby communities grew over time, and plant construction in the United States virtually died after the early 1980s. The 1986 disaster at Chernobyl only reinforced nuclear power's negative image. Yet in the decade prior to the Japanese nuclear crisis of 2011, sentiment about nuclear power underwent a marked change. The alarming acceleration of global warming due to the burning of fossil fuels and concern about dependence on foreign fuel has led policymakers, climate scientists, and energy experts to look once again at nuclear power as a source of energy.

Substantive Focus:
Defense and Security PRIMARY
International Relations SECONDARY

Theoretical Focus:
Agenda-Setting, Adoption, and Implementation PRIMARY
Policy Analysis and Evaluation SECONDARY

Keywords

NATIONAL SECURITY NUCLEAR TERRORISM COUNTER TERRORISM