Erwin Soriano de Leon

The Urban Institute
Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy

2100 M Street, NW
Washington, D.C.
20037
EdeLeon@urban.org

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Erwin de Leon is a research associate at the Urban Institute’s Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy, a columnist at Feet in 2 Worlds, and a regular contributor to the Nonprofit Quarterly, the Huffington Post, and WNYC’s It’s A Free Country. As a policy researcher at the Urban Institute, he is currently part of a research team examining the breadth and depth of nonprofit-government contracting and grants. He has authored or co-authored Urban Institute reports on government contracting and grants, stimulus funding of government programs, public education organizations, community-based immigrant nonprofits, and alternative measures to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). As a columnist for Feet in 2 Worlds, de Leon analyzes U.S. immigration policy and its impact on immigrant communities. His pieces for the Nonprofit Quarterly, the Huffington Post, and other media outlets focus on issues that affect nonprofit organizations, immigrants, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals and families.

Citation:
de Leon, Erwin. 2012. “Community-Based Asian American and Pacific Islander Organizations and Immigrant Integration.” AAPI Nexus Journal.
Abstract: In the United States, Asian American and Pacific Islander communities have continued to grow, creating new challenges for community-based organizations keeping up with growth and demand for services. Erwin de Leon’s resource paper, “Community-Based Organizations and Immigrant Integration in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area,” discusses community-based Asian American organizations in the D.C. metropolitan region and their work to help foster the integration of the increasing AAPI immigrant population. De Leon’s piece represents an important resource in addressing the gaps in major policy and service areas, including health care, poverty, worker’s rights, community development, and housing, that these organizations, coalitions, and networks must address in this period of economic contraction and recession.
URL: http://www.aasc.ucla.edu/archives/nexusv10n1.asp
Citation:
De Vita, Carol J. and Erwin de Leon. 2012. “Latino Organizations and Immigrant Integration in the Washington, DC Region” in Enrique S. Pumar (ed.) Hispanic Migration and Urban Development: Studies from Washington, DC (Research in Race and Ethnic Relations). Bingley, UK: Emerald Press Group Publishing Ltd.
Abstract: Purpose – To examine the role of Latino community-based nonprofits in integrating first- and second-generation Latino immigrants into mainstream society. Methodology/approach – This place-based study uses a mixed methods approach to analyze financial and administrative data from the National Center for Charitable Statistics and semi-structured interviews with organizational leaders. Findings – Latino community-based nonprofits provide a wide range of programs and services to their constituents that promote the social and political mobility of Latino immigrants and their families. Findings also suggest a potential spatial mismatch between Latino-serving nonprofits and the people they serve. The organizations are concentrated in the Washington, DC metropolitan area while the Latino community is branching out into the outer suburbs of Maryland and Virginia. Moreover, different political and administrative structures and policies affect the ability of these nonprofits to serve their constituents. Research limitations/implications – The study's geographic boundaries may limit the generalizability of spatial mismatch between Latino-serving nonprofits and their constituents. However, the findings about programs and services and the impact of political and administrative structures and policies can be applied to other immigrant-serving organizations. Practical implications – Policy makers, elected officials, and other stakeholders can learn the importance of Latino and immigrant community-based nonprofits. These organizations act as bridges to the Latino and other immigrant communities. Social implications – Latino and other immigrant community-based nonprofits are integral to the integration of immigrant communities as active and contributing members of wider society. Originality/value of paper – This study looks at immigrant integration through the lens of community-based nonprofits.
URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/books.htm?chapterid=17053953
Citation:
De Leon, Erwin, Sarah L. Pettijohn, and Carol J. De Vita. "Community Services Block Grant Administrative Expenses." Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.
Abstract: Funders want to know that their funds are being used for the purposes intended and are being spent efficiently and effectively. This is especially true when resources are constrained. This report reviews literature on measuring administrative expenses and analyzes the administrative expenses associated with the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG). The administrative expenses of Community Action Agencies that administer CSBG funds are compared to those of similar nonprofit organizations. The study’s findings suggest the need for greater clarity and consistency regarding administrative expenses across federal guidelines; greater training and technical assistance for financial officers who prepare reporting documents; and possibly different benchmarks regarding acceptable levels of administrative expenditures based on size of organization.
URL: http://www.urban.org/publications/412601.html
Citation:
De Leon, Erwin, and Elizabeth T. Boris. 2010. "The State of Society: Measuring Economic Success and Human Well-Being." Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.
Abstract: This study provides an overview of a broad range of existing measures that go beyond gross domestic product (GDP) to offer a more complete and accurate picture of how a society and its economy are faring. Based on a review of the literature and an analysis of major arguments and rationales for moving beyond GDP as a measure of national well-being, this report identifies 14 categories of national well-being. It synthesizes hundreds of indicators found in 28 reports that present alternative indices and systems of well-being into 79 indicators organized under these categories.rnrn
URL: http://www.urban.org/publications/412101.html
Citation:
De Leon, Erwin, Matthew Maronick, Carol J. De Vita, and Elizabeth T. Boris. "Community-Based Organizations and Immigrant Integration in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area." Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.
Abstract: This study examines immigrant integration through the lens of community-based organizations. Based on interviews with nonprofit leaders and an analysis of data from the National Center for Charitable Statistics, the study found that immigrant-serving nonprofits provide a wide range of programs and services to foreign-born communities which promote the social and political mobility of newcomers. Findings also suggest a potential spatial mismatch between immigrant-serving organizations and the people they serve. The organizations are concentrated in the metropolitan area while immigrant populations are growing in the outer suburbs. Moreover, different political and administrative structures and policies affect the ability of these nonprofits to serve their constituents
URL: http://www.urban.org/publications/411986.html
Citation:
Boris, Elizabeth, Erwin de Leon, Katie L. Roeger, and Milena Nikolova. 2010. "Human Service Nonprofits and Government Collaboration: Findings from the 2010 National Survey of Nonprofit Government Contracting and Grants." Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.
Abstract: This report explores the results of the 2010 National Survey of Nonprofit-Government Contracting and Grants, a study of human service organizations designed to document the extent of nonprofit-government contracting, processes and problems. It also examines the impact of the recession on these organizations and the cutbacks they have made to keep their programs operating. While contracting problems are not new, many are exacerbated by the deep recession that has reduced government budgets and private contributions. Nearly 33,000 human service nonprofits have government contracts and grants, and 9,000 organizations with expenditures over 100,000 were surveyed for this study.rnrn
URL: http://www.urban.org/publications/412228.html

Substantive Focus:
Social Policy PRIMARY
Urban Public Policy SECONDARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy History SECONDARY
Policy Analysis and Evaluation PRIMARY

Keywords

IMMIGRATION IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION NONPROFITS COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS PHILANTHROPY