Clair Eugene Rudison

Iowa Human Rights Department
Commission on the Status of African Americans

1903 53rd Street
Des Moines, Iowa
United States
50310
rudison2010@yahoo.com |  Visit Personal Website


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Iowa spearheads every state in the U.S. with the per capita incarceration of African American men; this small heartland state has a cumulative population of 2.98 million where 2.3% of the population is African American. Demographic figures illustrate that more than sixty percent of the people in prison are now racial minorities. The unenthusiastic statistics that designate an abundant share of this disheartening circumstance in unemployment figures, homicide rates (as both victims and guilty parties), their devastatingly inconsistent portrayal in the criminal justice system, as well as their last positioning on many appraises of educational accomplishment and ability have become commonplace that it has caused many to view the majority of these young men potential as despondent and unfeasible to rescue. (Garibaldi, 1992) For Black males in their thirties, 1 in every 10 is in prison or jail on any given day. This trend has intensified by the disproportionate impact of the “War on Drug,” in which two-thirds of all persons in prison for drug offenses are people of color. (Guerino, 2011)

Citation:
LITERACY, AN IMPERATIVE SOCIOECONOMIC INDICATOR OF INCARCERATION & POVERTY IN THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY by Clair E. Rudison, MPA
Abstract: The disproportionate numbers of African Americans incarcerated has created a socioeconomic and political vacuum within their communities, and human capital potential is being squandered away. In the interior of this manuscript are innovative policies and procedures to rectify the literacy issue within African Americans academic settings. Corrective reading programs that focus primarily on decoding, comprehension, with quarterly assessment on progression. Many African American inmates in Iowa’s Correctional Facilities have not completed high school, which often leads to incarceration and poverty. Iowa’s public school systems are failing to address the substandard presentations of the minority population. The “Direction Instruction” technique is an evidence-based procedure that has aided students in becoming proficiently literate, and the implementation of this program combined with legislative assistance to restrict current policies where public schools dictate their mandates on charter schools will, liberating charter schools to obtain an accurate alternative to the failed curriculum of the public school system. To increase academic performance among our students, the charter schools must be autonomous to form curricula that will advance Iowa students in math, science, and technology. Literacy is the foundation of academic achievement, not being able to comprehend the language provide for social problems later in life like incarceration and poverty.

Substantive Focus:
Economic Policy
Education Policy SECONDARY
Health Policy
Comparative Public Policy
Urban Public Policy PRIMARY

Theoretical Focus:
Agenda-Setting, Adoption, and Implementation PRIMARY

Keywords

POLITICS OF INCARCERATION