Lisa L. Miller

Rutgers University
Department of Political Science

89 George Street
New Brunswick, NJ
USA
08904
miller@polisci.rutgers.edu |  Visit Personal Website


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My research interests lie at the intersection of law and social policy and has focused on crime and punishment policy, and democratic practices that influence policy outcomes. In particular, I focus on political structures and institutions--including federalism, law, interest groups, political mobilization and participation--and their impact on the development of criminal laws and criminal justice policy. I am especially interested in the political mobilization of racial minorities and the poor and most of my work emphasizes the relationship between these groups and punishment politics. My research crosses intra- as well as inter-disciplinary boundaries, drawing upon work in public law, public policy, American political development, criminology, and political and sociological theory. My most recent book, "The Myth of Mob Rule: Violent crime and democratic politics," will be published by Oxford University Press in April 2016.

Citation:
“What’s Violence Got to Do With It? Inequality, Punishment and State Failure in American Politics.” 2015. Punishment and Society 17 (2):184-210.
Citation:
Miller, Lisa L. 2016 (forthcoming). The Myth of Mob Rule: Violent Crime and Democratic Politics. Oxford University Press.
Citation:
“The Local and the Legal: American Federalism and its Implications for the Carceral State.” 2011. Special Issue of Criminology and Public Policy: Mass Incarceration 10 (3):725-732.
Citation:
“Power to the People: Violent Victimization, Inequality and Democratic Politics.” 2013. Theoretical Criminology 17(3): 283-313.
Citation:
“The Invisible Black Victim: How American Federalism Perpetuates Racial Inequality in Criminal Justice.” 2010. Law and Society Review 44 (3/4): 805-842.
Citation:
Miller, Lisa L. 2007. "The Representational Biases of Federalism: Scope and Bias in the Political Process, Revisited." Perspectives on Politics 5: 305-321
Citation:
Miller, Lisa L. 2010. "The Invisible Black Victim: How American Federalism Perpetuates Racial Inequality in Criminal Justice." Law and Society Review 44: 805-842.
Citation:
Miller, Lisa L. 2008. The Perils of Federalism: Race, Poverty and the Politics of Crime Control. Oxford University Press.

Substantive Focus:
Law and Policy PRIMARY
Social Policy SECONDARY

Theoretical Focus:
Policy History SECONDARY
Agenda-Setting, Adoption, and Implementation PRIMARY

Keywords

FEDERALISM RACIAL INEQUALITY DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION CRIME VIOLENCE PUNISHMENT