Christopher D. Gore

Ryerson University
Politics and Public Administration and Environmental Applied Science and Management

350 Victoria St.
Toronto, ON
Canada
M5B2K3
chris.gore@ryerson.ca |  Visit Personal Website


Search Google Scholar
Search for Google Scholar Profile

The politics, policy and administration of urban and environmental issues in North America, and Africa. Areas of present and future research include: environmental and natural resource policy; comparative energy and climate change policy; comparative urban governance; multilevel policy processes; food security; comparative public policy; energy security; and cyber security and policy.

Citation:
Gore, Christopher D. 2010. "The Limits and Opportunities of Network Analysis: Municipalities and Canadian Climate Policy." Review of Policy Research 27 (1):27-46.
Abstract: Research on climate change policy and politics has become increasingly focused on the actions andrninfluence of subnational governments. In North America, this attention has been particularly focused onrnwhy subnational governments have taken action in the absence of national leadership, what effect actionrnmight have on future national climate policy, and whether the collective action of networks of municipalrngovernments are reshaping and challenging the character of national and global climate governance.rnThis paper examines Canadian municipal climate in light of the absence of a comprehensive and effectivernclimate national strategy. The paper considers various reasons why local governments in Canada havernnot been central players in national plans, and why their actions have not been more influentialrnnationally. The paper argues that the potential influence of Canadian municipalities on national climaternpolicy is weak, given the loose nature of the network and the long-held structural view that municipalitiesrnare not significant units of political analysis in national political and policy debates. The paper concludesrnby considering the constraints and opportunities of subnational climate networks and municipal networkrnanalysis.
URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1541-1338.2009.00425.x/abstract
Citation:
Gore, Christopher. 2008. Electricity and privatisation in Uganda: The origins of the crisis and problems with the response." In Electric Capitalism: Recolonising Africa on the Power Grid, ed. David McDonald, 359-399. Cape Town: Human Sciences Research Council; London: Earthscan.
Citation:
Gore, Christopher and Pamela Robinson. 2009. Local Government Response to Climate Change: Our Last, Best Hope? In Changing Climates in North American Politics: Institutions, Policymaking and Multilevel Governance, ed. Henrik Selin and Stacy D. VanDeveer, 137-158. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Citation:
Gore, Christopher and Nansozi Muwanga. Forthcoming. Decentralization is Dead, Long Live Decentralization! Capital City Reform and Political Rights in Kampala, Uganda. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.
Abstract: African cities are now experiencing some of the highest population growth rates in the world. Accompanying this growth is constant and continuing pressure on national and local governments to develop political and institutional structures that respond to the multiple pressures this demographic change invokes in relation to service delivery, economic development, and social well-being. In response to these challenges, national governments are reviewing the political and administrative structures of their capital cities, sometimes recentralizing authority. This paper examines the reforms to the capital city of Uganda, Kampala. The paper explains how the national government gradually created the legal conditions necessary to take over the capital city and the political rhetoric and conflict that ensued. We argue that while Kampala had deep internal problems and fared poorly in service delivery, these outcomes were amplified by the national government’s indifference to the city historically. Moreover, past service delivery failures offered an easy rationale to recentralize authority. We demonstrate that this recentralization was a well-planned effort by the central government to regain political control over the capital city. This paper illustrates how the recentralization of authority in Kampala is a significant departure from its longstanding policy of democratic decentralization.
Citation:
Gore, Christopher D. 2008. "Environment and Development in Uganda: Understanding the Global Influence on Domestic Policy." In Environmental Management in Global Context: Perspectives from the South, Jordi Diez and O.P. Dwived, eds. Peterborough: Broadview Press.
URL: http://www.utppublishing.com/Global-Environmental-Challenges-Perspectives-from-the-South.html
Citation:
Gore, Christopher D., and Peter Stoett, eds. 2009. Environmental Challenges and Opportunities: Local-Global Perspectives on Canadian Issues. Toronto: Emond Montgomery.
URL: http://www.emp.ca/index.php/hotproperty/property/university/environmental-challenges-and-opportunitiesbr-/local-global-perspectives-on-canadian-issues

Substantive Focus:
Energy and Natural Resource Policy
Environmental Policy PRIMARY
Governance
Science and Technology Policy
Comparative Public Policy SECONDARY
Urban Public Policy

Theoretical Focus:
Policy Process Theory PRIMARY
Agenda-Setting, Adoption, and Implementation SECONDARY
Policy Analysis and Evaluation

Keywords

MUNICIPAL COMPARATIVE POLICY AFRICA NORTH AMERICA CANADA CITIES URBAN GOVERNANCE MULTILEVEL GOVERNANCE NATURAL RESOURCES ENERGY SECURITY CLIMATE CHANGE